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China Music Group is Formed as a Division of China Media Ventures

January 10, 2011

CRC Jianian Releases Featured on Starbucks Year of The Rabbit CD

December 15, 2010

CRC Jianian and DMX Inc Announce Exclusive Music Programming Partnership

July 31, 2009

MIDEM 2008

January 27, 2008

CRC Jianian and Shazam Enter Into Agreement

November 28, 2007

Ministry of Culture Letter to CRC Jianian

Ministry of Culture - February 6, 2007

Billboard Interviews Ministry of Culture

Billboard - February 1, 2007

Government Shows Support for Music Made in China

MIDEM News - January 23, 2007

CRC Jianian Midem 07 Cocktail Party

January 23, 2007

Kobalt Administers CRC Jianian Catalog

May 8, 2006

BMI to Represent CRC Jianian Catalog

February 1, 2005

CRC Jianian Joint Venture Announcement

January 16, 2005

Piracy Reigns as Hot MIDEM Topic

Billboard - February 1, 2003

China and AIM Group Agreement

Variety - December 21, 2003

Shanghai Jazz Festival

September 9, 2003

Attorney Is Singing China's Song

Hollywood Reporter - December 20, 2002

China State Label

Hollywood Reporter - November 14, 2002

AIM Group Signs with China Record Corporation

November 12, 2002

ATTORNEY IS SINGING CHINA'S SONG

December 20, 2002 | The Hollywood Reporter By Jesse Hiestand

Frank Mayor spent 17 years making contacts and in-roads in the cloistered world of Chinese media. The persistence paid off last month when Mayor's Los Angeles-based AIM Group LLC secured the exclusive worldwide rights to license and distribute the audio and video catalog of the country's state-run China Record Corp. Mayor recently discussed his experiences in the Chinese media market with The Hollywood Reporter business reporter Jesse Hiestand.

THR: WHAT WAS IT LIKE IN 1985 WHEN YOU FIRST MADE CONTACTS IN THE CHINESE GOVERNMENT'S MINISTRY OF BROADCASTING?

MAYOR: They were very solidified in their ways and I made some preliminary inquiries about cooperating with them. I was pretty much told that they were not interested and I just persevered throughout the years.

THR: ANY PARTICULAR REASON FOR THE RESISTANCE?

MAYOR: It wasn't so much resistance as it was very centralized and part of the government and these were all just people taking their orders from up on high and there was no interest in interacting with the outside world.

THR: CAN YOU DESCRIBE SOME OF THOSE FIRST CONTACTS?

MAYOR: The facilities themselves were very modern. Radio broadcasting is a very centrally located building in Beijing and I was the first foreigner to set foot in there. Security was extremely tight--this is going back a few years. I remember people having submachine guns and people frisking me. It's loosened up since then.

THR: WHAT SPARKED THE CHANGE?

MAYOR: Obviously there's huge interest by foreign companies to get into China, which is one of the last few huge markets out there. Not only has it become much wealthier but obviously since they joined the World Trade Organization they've been sort of forced to adhere to international standards of trade and that of course includes a lot of the copyright laws and standards.

THR: HOW IS THE BUSINESS CLIMATE IN CHINA NOW?

MAYOR: It's much more open now that it's much less centralized. In fact, the government has essentially privatizing a lot of the large government corporations including China Record Corp. They way they do this is issue shares to some of the leading executives and give them a mandate to expand the business and basically cut them free from the central government. It's only happened in the last six months or so that they actually have a mandate now to deal with foreign companies and to essentially go out and make money on their own without getting top-level approval.

THR: DOES THIS AFFECT ALL TYPES OF MEDIA?

MAYOR: Essentially in the last six months the ministry of culture has cut everyone free and does not really monitor the entire situation. Each company--the television networks, people making movies and music industry--are free to basically pursue whatever business they choose.

THR: WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO PURSUE THESE OPPORTUNITIES?

MAYOR: It is certainly key to have contacts with the government. That's a big part of it. There's a lot of companies that want to get into China but really don't have a first clue on how to do it. Obviously my fortune is that I have the contacts that I've developed over the years and I've stuck with them for a long time and that gives me an edge over a lot of other people in terms of access.

THR: PART OF THAT TRUST WAS EARNED BY ADVISING CHINESE MUSIC EXECUTIVES OVER THE YEARS. ON WHAT TOPICS?

MAYOR: They've tried on occasion to work with the outside world, tried to do licensing deals and the time was never right for them. Obviously they're a little naive in terms of international business being that they've never had to make a profit for all this time. They've essentially had government budgets that they've spent and they need some guidance in that sense.

THR: WHAT ADVISE DO YOU HAVE FOR WESTERN MEDIA COMPANIES TRYING TO BREAK INTO THE CHINESE MARKET?

MAYOR: It's very important to be on top of what's happening legally. To give you some idea of the myriad laws that are being passed, in terms of copyright you're dealing with the National Peoples Congress, which is the top legislative body of China. Under them is the State Council, which basically enacts the laws. Then there's the Supreme Peoples Court, which does judicial interpretation, the interestingly named Standing Committee of the National Peoples Congress on Punishing Crimes of Infringement on Copyright--that's an official name. There's the Central Administration of Customs, the Ministry of Foreign Trade and Economic Cooperation and the Ministry of Culture. There are many government agencies that are in one way or another involved in copyright and protecting entertainment properties and it's important to have contacts in all of these agencies.

THR: SO THE CHINESE ARE SERIOUS ABOUT OPENING THEIR MARKETS TO WESTERN MEDIA?

MAYOR: There's a huge opening and next year will see numerous changes happen. You can follow the news in terms of the big companies that are moving in. You have Universal Studios, which is going to open a theme park in Shanghai. You have Warner Bros. and Sony that are moving in, so a lot of activity will happen next year.

THR: WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO WITH THE WORLDWIDE LICENSING AND DISTRIBUTION RIGHTS TO THIS VAST COLLECTION OF CHINESE RECORDED MUSIC?

MAYOR: We want to bring Chinese music to the world. We're putting together a plan in terms of how we will release some of this to the public, license some of it. We're also working with their (CRC's) management company to bring Chinese artists to the U.S., particularly the cities where there's large Asian communities. We're also tied into the Beijing Olympics (in 2008) and CRC is going to be handling all the music for the Olympics so we're hoping to get that together.

THR: HOW GREAT IS THE OPPORTUNITY POSED BY CHINA'S MARKETS?

MAYOR: It's going to be huge. At this point even though the average urban Chinese may make only about $1,000 a month, this is a country where housing is essentially free and most people don't have cars and there's also a one-child policy. So essentially they have $1,000 disposable income to spend (every month).